Saturday, April 23, 2011

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: DIY Glass Straw Cup (and tutorial)

I posted a bit of a rant last month about how all I wanted in life was a glass travel mug that had a lid and a straw that was not made out of plastic. Considering all of the awareness lately about the toxins found in plastic and how glass or stainless steel are best, I was surprised how difficult it was to find what I want.  So I did what any savvy crafter would do: I made my own.  In two versions:  Basic and Fancy




They have all the features I've been looking for in a cup (other than double walled insulation): glass, non-plastic straw, screw on lid so I don't spill my drink everywhere if I knock it over.

PLUS it reuses material that otherwise would end up in a landfill or recycling facility. It's way better to repurpose the things we already have than send them into the high energy, still somewhat wasteful recycling process.

Supplies Needed:
  • Old Spaghetti sauce jar (or other glass jar) with screw on lid)
  • Paint suitable for metal (I chose Plaid Outdoor paint b/c it's water base and non toxic)
  • Rubber Grommet (1/4" in inside diameter)
  • Stainless Steel straw (I used these)
Step 1: Prep Your Jar (s)
Rinse your jars and soak to remove the label.  Remove any lingering label residue and wash jar and lid throughly.  


Step 2: Paint the Lid

Remove the lid from your jar and spread a large piece of saran wrap over the top.

Re-attach lid to jar over the saran wrap. This will let us paint the lid without worrying about getting paint inside the lid where it will touch your beverage

Wipe your lid with rubbing alcohol to remove any grime or fingerprints

Paint lid using Plaid brand Outdoor point. Once dry to the touch, gently unscrew lid so it can sit and cure without attaching to the saran wrap.  Allow to cure for 48 hours.


Step 3: Decorate Your Jar
My first attempt at decorating my jar went like this:
I printed out my name out in a cool font on the back of some clear contact paper. Meticulously cut out design using exacto knife in order to make a stencil. Wiped glass with rubbing alcohol and applied stencil to glass. Painted over glass using Plaid glass & ceramic paint. Let Dry. Peeled up stencil. Cried. (I mean, really, look how ugly that last picture is)

Because not enough paint stuck too the glass and too much stuck to the contact paper and peeled away. I had invested maybe 2-2.5 hours in this step at this point and was SO disheartened.

All that to say: Don't do what I did. Buy a glass paint pen and freehand draw your design. Or use stickers. Or apply vinyl if you have a fancy vinyl cutting machine. This might even be a fun family project to let everyone personalize their own jar.

One one jar I just wrote my name along the bottom and on the other I drew flowers and vines all over

Step 4: Attach the Straw
If all you want is a cup to sip from, really, you could stop at step three. If you're like me and need a straw for clumsiness ease follow these steps once your lid is done curing:

Grab a grommet and drop it into a cup of super hot tap water. This will make it more flexible and easier to smoosh into the hole you're about to make.

Use a tiny drill bit to screw a wee little hole right smack in the middle of your lid. Hold your lid over a sink or covered work area to catch little metal shavings that might peel off during this part.

Get the next drill bit size up in your drill bit kit. Drill through your pilot hole, expanding the diameter. Keep working through your drill bits, moving up one size at a time, slowly increasing the size of your hole until it is just big enough to slide your straw through. Then go one size larger.


Get the grommet out of the water (don't get burned!) and smoosh it through the hole so the lip on either side holds it in place. Wash your lid really well to remove any paint or metal shavings.

Get one of your brand new shiny straws and clean it with the little cleaner brush it came with.

Stab that baby through the middle of your grommet.

ENJOY!
Screw your lid back onto your jar and enjoy your new non-toxic portable beverage container!

I'm sharing this with:
Visit thecsiproject.com

50 comments:

  1. I have been using a stainless steel bottle, but hated the way they would sweat if I had a cold drink in them, so I made a crochet "sock" for mine with an elastic neck to fit over it. That may be a solution to the double wall for you. I found it helps to insulate as well as sop up the sweat, especially if you use cotton yarn. Only problem is that it would cover up your pretty designs. Love the straws though, didn't know they came in stainless!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, this is so clever, Carissa! I'm going to share with all my friends, so expect some link love!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very cute and clever. I ended up buying a ceramic cup with a silicone lid as I frequently need to reheat hot drinks and stainless doesn't allow this. But, I love the creativity!

    ReplyDelete
  4. oh my gosh! This is exactly the tutorial I've needed!! I was frustrated about not being able to find a glass travel mug, too!

    One question: does the lid seal well? do you have any leakage around the lid? If I made one, it will go in my husband's lunch bag and it would be laying on its side some of the time.

    ReplyDelete
  5. so cool love it I added it to pinterest :) so I don't forget thanks so much

    ReplyDelete
  6. you can find it on my board want to make just look under Julia Brooks not sure if your on pinterest yet

    ReplyDelete
  7. The only thing that would make it better would be a handle (I can see my butter fingers dropping the slick sides of this right out). There is a brand of Jelly that uses a mug style handled jar. I think I might try this with one.

    Janelle

    ReplyDelete
  8. JessA - The second one I made actually seals a little too well b/c it's hard to suck stuff up the straw. Even that one, though, isn't totally spill proof. Ideally, you want some air to sneak in around the seal to make drinking easy but still make it spill resistant. If you needed to put it on it's side in a lunch box, I would get 2 lids. Don't modify one (maybe paint it)and use that for when it's in the lunch bag and have the lid with a straw in the sack that he can attach when it's lunch time. Then he can seal back up with the first lid when it's time to pack stuff back up again.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Cool, but I will take the plastic "toxins" over the inevitable metal stabbings any day

    ReplyDelete
  10. I just had a similar idea! I've discovered that the jarred (in glass jars) of organic tomatoes by bionaturae or Central Market fit perfectly into the cup holders of the car and stroller. At 24 ounces each, they're only an ounce smaller than the spagetti jars, too. Now - to find the rubber grommet!

    ReplyDelete
  11. i used to have a great neoprene sleeve with a shoulder strap. traveled with me on a summer study abroad. i've since lost it :( but plan to make another. either side of neop looped around the bottle neck and had an adjustable shoulder strap that looped the other way (to go under). hung perfect across my chest. that would work great for this! insulate from sweating and breaking.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I wondered if the Cricut Vinyl would stick as it sweats. May try Glass Etching too, for a subtle design.

    THANKS for posting!!!! I'm sooo going to try this!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Just wondering about the BPA in the lids of these jars. Does this bother anyone else?? I have a stainless steel water botter and it works great, it is also unbreakable!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I LOVE IT! I was just talking to a friend who had a plastic one of these with the plastic straw. I was thinking to myself I wish it was not plastic. This is so simple, easy, why didn't I think of that? Great idea. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I decided to not worry about the BPA on the underside of the lid b/c the way this design is set up, the water really isn't touching the underside of the lid most of the time. In a plastic container or with a plastic straw, the water would be steeping in plastic. This way, the occasional splash might touch...but really, I think you probably get more BPA exposure touching a cash register receipt than you will in a week of using this cup

    ReplyDelete
  16. A mason jar lid would be perfect for this and would eliminate the need to worry about bpa's in the lid.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Great ideas here.

    I actually bought a pair of super cute "designer" woman's cotton socks...I never wore them...but they DO work for an awesome stainless steel bottle holder. I also have seen holders with long shoulder straps crocheted from things like a recycled t-shirt, or plastic bags!

    You could make a cushiony holder to protect the glass bottle here. Even a pouch from an old pair of jeans (the slim legs are great to use) would be awesome to turn this into a travel water jug.

    Thanks for inspiring us all! Did not know about those stainless steel straws. MUST get some.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Great idea Carissa! I love it so much that I've put it on our Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/friendsofglass). :-)

    Thanks for sharing such a creative glass idea.
    If you have others, don't hesitate sharing them with us! We love glass! ;-)

    Hope to hear from you soon!

    Kind regards

    Shani from Friends of Glass

    ReplyDelete
  19. This is crazy brilliant. I'm impressed with your resourcefulness.

    ReplyDelete
  20. This is awesome! I think I have to make one. After a recent scare with my laptop and some spilled water, I'm all about things that'll protect my stuff from my clumsy self!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi, your blog was recommended to me. I love this idea! where did you find the straws?

    ReplyDelete
  22. I found the straws on Amazon.com. Just search "stainless straws" and you'll see quite a few options.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Awsome idea! I'm definatley going to have to try it, plus I love any excuse to bust out the power drill ;) I would definatley use glass etching cream (I'm so addicted to that stuff) to decorate the cup because its easy to use with a contact paper stencil and then you could even go back and color in your design with a paint pen, I've done that on regular glasses before and it looks awsome. And making an insulated sleeve for the cup with some cute fabric and batting would also be a good decoration/solution for the lack of double wall insulation.
    I do have a couple questions though. Does the stainless steel straw give your drinks a funky/metalic taste? Because I know that sometimes the metal water bottles do that if they're not lined, especailly with certain drinks like orange juice.
    And do you have any problem with water getting trapped inbetween the rubber washer and the lid when you're washing it? It just seems like that would be a perfect place for mold to grow. I know I'm probably sounding paranoid, but you know those little kids cuppys with the rubber plunger in the top so they don't spill? Well I used to babysit for a lady that didn't know you're supposed to take the plunger out when you wash the cup and just left it in there and the cuppys would always get nasty mold in there and that's what I see happening with the rubber washer in the lid since I'm assuming you don't take the washer out every time you wash the cup.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I knew about glass straws but never bought them for fear of breakage. I use straws all the time and dislike that they are plastic, I'm so getting the stainless ones. Thanks for the info. and the tutorial.

    ReplyDelete
  25. someone is making pyrex straws & they make extra big ones for smoothies by getting a few of those & your tute, I'm so making my own! BRILLIANT!

    ReplyDelete
  26. I found that the straws needed a break in voyage in a non-water beverage like iced tea and then they were fine as far as a metal taste.

    I do not remove the grommet to wash the lid, but there enough space around the grommet to clean around it. It is not designed to be an exact fitting or water tight seal (b/c air needs to get into the cup)

    ReplyDelete
  27. YOU have made my day!! I have been looking for a "better mouse trap" and you built one!!
    Can you e-mail me with how long the straw is?
    I buy jam's and jelly in glass jars that have handles and metal lids this will be perfect. Looking forward from hearing from you.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Majeral - I would love to e-mail you but you didn't leave it and your blogger profile isn't enabled to view publicly so hopefully you'll come back here to check. The straws are 8.5 inches long

    ReplyDelete
  29. Carissa, Sorry I did not leave my e-mail
    Majeral (vie78666@gmail.com)
    Keep creating...
    Maj

    ReplyDelete
  30. Cool beans! Thanks! I'm soooo going to make these now.....actually I think this may end up being everyone's X-Mas presents this year. I was thinking and I don't think I use anything that comes in a glass jar but then I remembered my afinity for using mason jars as glasses and how thrift stores always have them, so its still re-using, I'm just using someone elses old stuff.

    Also, along the same lines as this, I was at Ross last night and they have re-usable hot-drink travel mugs that are made of porcelin and have a silicon lid and silicon grippy around the middle. Just thought I'd pass that along to you guys since you're all fellow anti-plastic-people. Oh and best part, they were only $5 each and came in cute colors.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Carissa, Check this out. I thought ok lets see . $33. for one glass ? I think not.http://www.dailygrommet.com/products/bottlesup-recycled-glass-water-bottles/?utm_content=my_points&utm_source=CC&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20110505
    vie78666@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  32. What an awesome idea & tutorial! I am a new follower of yours! Can't wait to see what other crafty things you come up with! =)

    ReplyDelete
  33. nice to see a greeen blogpost..needed !!

    but i see that u suggest use of cling plastic/plastic for the DIY...there could be a way to avoid that too right

    ReplyDelete
  34. and one more thing..i have a steel set from india with screwable lid...and most places refused to serve me in the bottle stating rules :(.. i live in atlanta

    ReplyDelete
  35. That's interesting, Sudha. I live in the Northwest so I think there is a little bit more general awareness here about green lifestyles and reusable options from bags to cups and more.

    Starbucks across the country as company policy should accept reusable containers as long as you remove the lid for them.

    ReplyDelete
  36. where did you pick up your straws? looks like crate and barrel or is that at home?

    ReplyDelete
  37. The picture is in my house but I ordered them from amazon. Just search for 'stainless straws' and a few options will come up

    ReplyDelete
  38. what rock have i been under- i didn't even know you could buy stainless steel straws??? so cool!

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hi! We featured your project at Love and Trash! http://loveandtrash.com/2011/06/cute-needs-a-reason-link-rodeo/

    ReplyDelete
  40. I found some adjustable velcro neoprene sleeves for your bottle on amazon.com. They are made by Kool Cup..$5.99 for 6 of them. Such a cute idea!

    ReplyDelete
  41. Hi. I love the stainless steel straws. I have to get some. Also, I have a stainless steel water bottle from flylady.net that doesn't sweat. It's wonderful and keeps my drinks cold all day!

    ReplyDelete
  42. I can't wait to try making these, especially since you have such an awesome name! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  43. This is a genius idea! Will save this for when I need a new travel drink container.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I totally made one of these! Thanks for the tutorial!

    ReplyDelete
  45. Thank you, Carissa for such a great idea! I love it! I was wondering where you found the grommets? I noticed in the comments you listed Amazon.com as the online site for the straws. Were the grommets found there as well? Thanks so much for the cute and GREEN idea! I look forward to your response!

    ReplyDelete
  46. I bought the grommets at my local Home Depot. They are in the electric wiring section (the grommets are usually used to protect wires being run through metal so the metal does not damage the wire. you could even bring the picture I show with the backing from the package with a grommet on it with you and I'm sure the helpful people at your hardware store can point you in the right direction :-)

    ReplyDelete
  47. Brilliant!!! I punched a hole in the lid of a mason jar and popped my metal straw in to similar effect, but it doesn't fit in the dang cupholder, and the straw rattles (minor, first world problems, but still) so I am DELIGHTED to see this solution! Rubber grommet and glass jar that fits into the cupholder on my car, and I am good to go!!

    ReplyDelete
  48. you need the little rubber gasket to hold the straw in.

    ReplyDelete

Comments make me happy! Thanks in advance for sharing your thoughts.

Saturday, April 23, 2011

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: DIY Glass Straw Cup (and tutorial)

I posted a bit of a rant last month about how all I wanted in life was a glass travel mug that had a lid and a straw that was not made out of plastic. Considering all of the awareness lately about the toxins found in plastic and how glass or stainless steel are best, I was surprised how difficult it was to find what I want.  So I did what any savvy crafter would do: I made my own.  In two versions:  Basic and Fancy




They have all the features I've been looking for in a cup (other than double walled insulation): glass, non-plastic straw, screw on lid so I don't spill my drink everywhere if I knock it over.

PLUS it reuses material that otherwise would end up in a landfill or recycling facility. It's way better to repurpose the things we already have than send them into the high energy, still somewhat wasteful recycling process.

Supplies Needed:
  • Old Spaghetti sauce jar (or other glass jar) with screw on lid)
  • Paint suitable for metal (I chose Plaid Outdoor paint b/c it's water base and non toxic)
  • Rubber Grommet (1/4" in inside diameter)
  • Stainless Steel straw (I used these)
Step 1: Prep Your Jar (s)
Rinse your jars and soak to remove the label.  Remove any lingering label residue and wash jar and lid throughly.  


Step 2: Paint the Lid

Remove the lid from your jar and spread a large piece of saran wrap over the top.

Re-attach lid to jar over the saran wrap. This will let us paint the lid without worrying about getting paint inside the lid where it will touch your beverage

Wipe your lid with rubbing alcohol to remove any grime or fingerprints

Paint lid using Plaid brand Outdoor point. Once dry to the touch, gently unscrew lid so it can sit and cure without attaching to the saran wrap.  Allow to cure for 48 hours.


Step 3: Decorate Your Jar
My first attempt at decorating my jar went like this:
I printed out my name out in a cool font on the back of some clear contact paper. Meticulously cut out design using exacto knife in order to make a stencil. Wiped glass with rubbing alcohol and applied stencil to glass. Painted over glass using Plaid glass & ceramic paint. Let Dry. Peeled up stencil. Cried. (I mean, really, look how ugly that last picture is)

Because not enough paint stuck too the glass and too much stuck to the contact paper and peeled away. I had invested maybe 2-2.5 hours in this step at this point and was SO disheartened.

All that to say: Don't do what I did. Buy a glass paint pen and freehand draw your design. Or use stickers. Or apply vinyl if you have a fancy vinyl cutting machine. This might even be a fun family project to let everyone personalize their own jar.

One one jar I just wrote my name along the bottom and on the other I drew flowers and vines all over

Step 4: Attach the Straw
If all you want is a cup to sip from, really, you could stop at step three. If you're like me and need a straw for clumsiness ease follow these steps once your lid is done curing:

Grab a grommet and drop it into a cup of super hot tap water. This will make it more flexible and easier to smoosh into the hole you're about to make.

Use a tiny drill bit to screw a wee little hole right smack in the middle of your lid. Hold your lid over a sink or covered work area to catch little metal shavings that might peel off during this part.

Get the next drill bit size up in your drill bit kit. Drill through your pilot hole, expanding the diameter. Keep working through your drill bits, moving up one size at a time, slowly increasing the size of your hole until it is just big enough to slide your straw through. Then go one size larger.


Get the grommet out of the water (don't get burned!) and smoosh it through the hole so the lip on either side holds it in place. Wash your lid really well to remove any paint or metal shavings.

Get one of your brand new shiny straws and clean it with the little cleaner brush it came with.

Stab that baby through the middle of your grommet.

ENJOY!
Screw your lid back onto your jar and enjoy your new non-toxic portable beverage container!

I'm sharing this with:
Visit thecsiproject.com

50 comments:

  1. I have been using a stainless steel bottle, but hated the way they would sweat if I had a cold drink in them, so I made a crochet "sock" for mine with an elastic neck to fit over it. That may be a solution to the double wall for you. I found it helps to insulate as well as sop up the sweat, especially if you use cotton yarn. Only problem is that it would cover up your pretty designs. Love the straws though, didn't know they came in stainless!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, this is so clever, Carissa! I'm going to share with all my friends, so expect some link love!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very cute and clever. I ended up buying a ceramic cup with a silicone lid as I frequently need to reheat hot drinks and stainless doesn't allow this. But, I love the creativity!

    ReplyDelete
  4. oh my gosh! This is exactly the tutorial I've needed!! I was frustrated about not being able to find a glass travel mug, too!

    One question: does the lid seal well? do you have any leakage around the lid? If I made one, it will go in my husband's lunch bag and it would be laying on its side some of the time.

    ReplyDelete
  5. so cool love it I added it to pinterest :) so I don't forget thanks so much

    ReplyDelete
  6. you can find it on my board want to make just look under Julia Brooks not sure if your on pinterest yet

    ReplyDelete
  7. The only thing that would make it better would be a handle (I can see my butter fingers dropping the slick sides of this right out). There is a brand of Jelly that uses a mug style handled jar. I think I might try this with one.

    Janelle

    ReplyDelete
  8. JessA - The second one I made actually seals a little too well b/c it's hard to suck stuff up the straw. Even that one, though, isn't totally spill proof. Ideally, you want some air to sneak in around the seal to make drinking easy but still make it spill resistant. If you needed to put it on it's side in a lunch box, I would get 2 lids. Don't modify one (maybe paint it)and use that for when it's in the lunch bag and have the lid with a straw in the sack that he can attach when it's lunch time. Then he can seal back up with the first lid when it's time to pack stuff back up again.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Cool, but I will take the plastic "toxins" over the inevitable metal stabbings any day

    ReplyDelete
  10. I just had a similar idea! I've discovered that the jarred (in glass jars) of organic tomatoes by bionaturae or Central Market fit perfectly into the cup holders of the car and stroller. At 24 ounces each, they're only an ounce smaller than the spagetti jars, too. Now - to find the rubber grommet!

    ReplyDelete
  11. i used to have a great neoprene sleeve with a shoulder strap. traveled with me on a summer study abroad. i've since lost it :( but plan to make another. either side of neop looped around the bottle neck and had an adjustable shoulder strap that looped the other way (to go under). hung perfect across my chest. that would work great for this! insulate from sweating and breaking.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I wondered if the Cricut Vinyl would stick as it sweats. May try Glass Etching too, for a subtle design.

    THANKS for posting!!!! I'm sooo going to try this!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Just wondering about the BPA in the lids of these jars. Does this bother anyone else?? I have a stainless steel water botter and it works great, it is also unbreakable!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I LOVE IT! I was just talking to a friend who had a plastic one of these with the plastic straw. I was thinking to myself I wish it was not plastic. This is so simple, easy, why didn't I think of that? Great idea. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I decided to not worry about the BPA on the underside of the lid b/c the way this design is set up, the water really isn't touching the underside of the lid most of the time. In a plastic container or with a plastic straw, the water would be steeping in plastic. This way, the occasional splash might touch...but really, I think you probably get more BPA exposure touching a cash register receipt than you will in a week of using this cup

    ReplyDelete
  16. A mason jar lid would be perfect for this and would eliminate the need to worry about bpa's in the lid.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Great ideas here.

    I actually bought a pair of super cute "designer" woman's cotton socks...I never wore them...but they DO work for an awesome stainless steel bottle holder. I also have seen holders with long shoulder straps crocheted from things like a recycled t-shirt, or plastic bags!

    You could make a cushiony holder to protect the glass bottle here. Even a pouch from an old pair of jeans (the slim legs are great to use) would be awesome to turn this into a travel water jug.

    Thanks for inspiring us all! Did not know about those stainless steel straws. MUST get some.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Great idea Carissa! I love it so much that I've put it on our Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/friendsofglass). :-)

    Thanks for sharing such a creative glass idea.
    If you have others, don't hesitate sharing them with us! We love glass! ;-)

    Hope to hear from you soon!

    Kind regards

    Shani from Friends of Glass

    ReplyDelete
  19. This is crazy brilliant. I'm impressed with your resourcefulness.

    ReplyDelete
  20. This is awesome! I think I have to make one. After a recent scare with my laptop and some spilled water, I'm all about things that'll protect my stuff from my clumsy self!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi, your blog was recommended to me. I love this idea! where did you find the straws?

    ReplyDelete
  22. I found the straws on Amazon.com. Just search "stainless straws" and you'll see quite a few options.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Awsome idea! I'm definatley going to have to try it, plus I love any excuse to bust out the power drill ;) I would definatley use glass etching cream (I'm so addicted to that stuff) to decorate the cup because its easy to use with a contact paper stencil and then you could even go back and color in your design with a paint pen, I've done that on regular glasses before and it looks awsome. And making an insulated sleeve for the cup with some cute fabric and batting would also be a good decoration/solution for the lack of double wall insulation.
    I do have a couple questions though. Does the stainless steel straw give your drinks a funky/metalic taste? Because I know that sometimes the metal water bottles do that if they're not lined, especailly with certain drinks like orange juice.
    And do you have any problem with water getting trapped inbetween the rubber washer and the lid when you're washing it? It just seems like that would be a perfect place for mold to grow. I know I'm probably sounding paranoid, but you know those little kids cuppys with the rubber plunger in the top so they don't spill? Well I used to babysit for a lady that didn't know you're supposed to take the plunger out when you wash the cup and just left it in there and the cuppys would always get nasty mold in there and that's what I see happening with the rubber washer in the lid since I'm assuming you don't take the washer out every time you wash the cup.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I knew about glass straws but never bought them for fear of breakage. I use straws all the time and dislike that they are plastic, I'm so getting the stainless ones. Thanks for the info. and the tutorial.

    ReplyDelete
  25. someone is making pyrex straws & they make extra big ones for smoothies by getting a few of those & your tute, I'm so making my own! BRILLIANT!

    ReplyDelete
  26. I found that the straws needed a break in voyage in a non-water beverage like iced tea and then they were fine as far as a metal taste.

    I do not remove the grommet to wash the lid, but there enough space around the grommet to clean around it. It is not designed to be an exact fitting or water tight seal (b/c air needs to get into the cup)

    ReplyDelete
  27. YOU have made my day!! I have been looking for a "better mouse trap" and you built one!!
    Can you e-mail me with how long the straw is?
    I buy jam's and jelly in glass jars that have handles and metal lids this will be perfect. Looking forward from hearing from you.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Majeral - I would love to e-mail you but you didn't leave it and your blogger profile isn't enabled to view publicly so hopefully you'll come back here to check. The straws are 8.5 inches long

    ReplyDelete
  29. Carissa, Sorry I did not leave my e-mail
    Majeral (vie78666@gmail.com)
    Keep creating...
    Maj

    ReplyDelete
  30. Cool beans! Thanks! I'm soooo going to make these now.....actually I think this may end up being everyone's X-Mas presents this year. I was thinking and I don't think I use anything that comes in a glass jar but then I remembered my afinity for using mason jars as glasses and how thrift stores always have them, so its still re-using, I'm just using someone elses old stuff.

    Also, along the same lines as this, I was at Ross last night and they have re-usable hot-drink travel mugs that are made of porcelin and have a silicon lid and silicon grippy around the middle. Just thought I'd pass that along to you guys since you're all fellow anti-plastic-people. Oh and best part, they were only $5 each and came in cute colors.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Carissa, Check this out. I thought ok lets see . $33. for one glass ? I think not.http://www.dailygrommet.com/products/bottlesup-recycled-glass-water-bottles/?utm_content=my_points&utm_source=CC&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20110505
    vie78666@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  32. What an awesome idea & tutorial! I am a new follower of yours! Can't wait to see what other crafty things you come up with! =)

    ReplyDelete
  33. nice to see a greeen blogpost..needed !!

    but i see that u suggest use of cling plastic/plastic for the DIY...there could be a way to avoid that too right

    ReplyDelete
  34. and one more thing..i have a steel set from india with screwable lid...and most places refused to serve me in the bottle stating rules :(.. i live in atlanta

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  35. That's interesting, Sudha. I live in the Northwest so I think there is a little bit more general awareness here about green lifestyles and reusable options from bags to cups and more.

    Starbucks across the country as company policy should accept reusable containers as long as you remove the lid for them.

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  36. where did you pick up your straws? looks like crate and barrel or is that at home?

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  37. The picture is in my house but I ordered them from amazon. Just search for 'stainless straws' and a few options will come up

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  38. what rock have i been under- i didn't even know you could buy stainless steel straws??? so cool!

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  39. Hi! We featured your project at Love and Trash! http://loveandtrash.com/2011/06/cute-needs-a-reason-link-rodeo/

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  40. I found some adjustable velcro neoprene sleeves for your bottle on amazon.com. They are made by Kool Cup..$5.99 for 6 of them. Such a cute idea!

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  41. Hi. I love the stainless steel straws. I have to get some. Also, I have a stainless steel water bottle from flylady.net that doesn't sweat. It's wonderful and keeps my drinks cold all day!

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  42. I can't wait to try making these, especially since you have such an awesome name! ;)

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  43. This is a genius idea! Will save this for when I need a new travel drink container.

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  44. I totally made one of these! Thanks for the tutorial!

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  45. Thank you, Carissa for such a great idea! I love it! I was wondering where you found the grommets? I noticed in the comments you listed Amazon.com as the online site for the straws. Were the grommets found there as well? Thanks so much for the cute and GREEN idea! I look forward to your response!

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  46. I bought the grommets at my local Home Depot. They are in the electric wiring section (the grommets are usually used to protect wires being run through metal so the metal does not damage the wire. you could even bring the picture I show with the backing from the package with a grommet on it with you and I'm sure the helpful people at your hardware store can point you in the right direction :-)

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  47. Brilliant!!! I punched a hole in the lid of a mason jar and popped my metal straw in to similar effect, but it doesn't fit in the dang cupholder, and the straw rattles (minor, first world problems, but still) so I am DELIGHTED to see this solution! Rubber grommet and glass jar that fits into the cupholder on my car, and I am good to go!!

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  48. you need the little rubber gasket to hold the straw in.

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